The Magic of Music

Enjoying and appreciating music may still appeal to persons living with dementia, but music may offer a lot more than pleasure: a connection to memory and emotional expression that might not be otherwise accessible. Read these simple but powerful stories to be reminded of the myriad ways we might incorporate music into daily life, to both entertain and ENGAGE! Continue reading

Pioneer Conference Keynote Inspires ‘Living Our Values’ at Jewish Senior Services

“…the generations must find ways to share daily life. Elders need the stimulation of young people … elders need relationships with middle-agers, whose challenges are not so far removed from their own at that age. Children and young people need … Continue reading

Creating Home and Poetry

Through our PersonFirst® trainings, Action Pact has long promoted community circles as a tool for meaningful engagement with residents living with dementia. An open-ended question is posed to the group and each resident, sometimes with encouragement from staff, answers the question or comments on the topic. In this way, staff and residents get to know each other better and build community with the side benefit of gaining a better understanding about how best to serve the residents in their daily lives.

The residents of The Village Court, the memory support neighborhood of Asbury Place Maryville in Maryville, TN, recently took their “fun circle” (as they call it) in a creative direction. Continue reading

Residents Become PersonFirst® Trainers at Assisi House

High involvement is at the core of Action Pact’s PersonFirst® training. After all, it is a train the trainer model wherein Action Pact consultants train folks in an organization who then train others on the principles of putting the person first. Traditionally, PersonFirst® is a program for staff. Sometimes residents from Independent Living or spouses of those living in the nursing home will be trained. The community of Assisi House in Aston, PA, the retirement convent for the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia, has really taken the high involvement to heart and included resident sisters among the first to be trained. Continue reading

Vibrant Living Prevents Falls and Eliminates Need for Alarms

by Carmen Bowman

When restraints were much more common, care plans often stated, “Release restraint at meal time.” Why when we felt people needed to be in restraints all day did we feel comfortable releasing restraints at meal times? Some people say because residents were tucked up to a table. Some say because “we were there” supervising. Although both of these are true, I contend that the residents were still because they were eating a meal and engaged with life. Continue reading

4 Ways High Involvement Supports Organizational Transformation

High involvement is essential for deep transformation. W. Edwards Deming, a statistician, was credited with Japan’s rise in manufacturing after World War II. The improvements were seen clearly in the quality of Japanese cars that began to dominate American highways in the 1970’s. Deming’s processes gradually came to influence the entire auto industry. In his book Out of the Crisis, published in 1982, he detailed 14 points vital to transforming business. His 14th point: Transformation is everyone’s job. Continue reading