Flying High with Self-led Teams

MARVIN’S PILOT GOT IT RIGHT!

One of the most unifying and powerful accomplishments of self-led teams is realizing that no job and no person is viewed as greater than another. The equation itself is simple: no greater than or less than, only equal to. So every job is just as important as the next. All the jobs that need to be done in a household are done to help the members of that household have a better day. It doesn’t matter if it is wiping the table or taking out the trash or helping with medications. Self-led teams do not get hung up on titles, you simply get in where you fit in that day. Continue reading “Flying High with Self-led Teams”

Residents with disabilities find new life in Inglis Neighborhoods

Evidence that person-centered care is making a difference.”

So wrote Gavin Kerr, Inglis CEO, in an email he forwarded to his executive team last July. In the original message, a physical therapist praises long-term care staff at Inglis House in Philadelphia for the remarkable progress made by a resident with severe physical disabilities.

“They (staff) did the impossible,” the therapist wrote. One resident “told me she got out of bed and ate in the solarium yesterday. This is something that has not been done as far as I know, ever. She is now agreeing to get out of bed three times a week to eat lunch in the solarium… We talked; ‘New room, new life,’ she said.” Continue reading “Residents with disabilities find new life in Inglis Neighborhoods”

Asbury Nabs 3 LeadingAge Awards: ‘It’s This Change Journey We’re On’

The change initiative at Asbury Place Maryville got a big thumbs-up in May when staff and volunteers garnered three top honors given to programs or services that go above and beyond normal operations to enhance the field of aging services. The awards were given by LeadingAge Tennessee at its 2014 Annual Conference. Continue reading “Asbury Nabs 3 LeadingAge Awards: ‘It’s This Change Journey We’re On’”

When Hierarchy Reigns, Culture Change Efforts Flounder

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We can create homey spaces, offer elders more choice and change long standing institutional practices, but culture change and the Household Model will not be effective unless we flatten the organization. As long as hierarchy reigns, elders will not be in control of their own lives. And as long as departmental silos dictate the way things are done, staff closest to elders will not be able to do what they can to help elders live a meaningful life in a place that truly feels like home. A nursing home can have a warm appearance, a friendly atmosphere, do fun and interesting things with its residents, but unless the decisions of daily life are made by elders and those closest to them, the culture is still one of one-size-fits-all-this-is-just-the-way-it’s-done.

Elders can’t make choices in the moment when what they want needs to be OK’d by three different people, one or two of whom may not even know them. One of the things we all enjoy about being in our own homes as opposed to work, a hotel or even at a friend or family member’s home, is the freedom to make spontaneous decisions, to have things the way we like them and go about our day according to our own schedule.  A household or neighborhood team comprised of staff from all disciplines that makes decisions together and is responsible to one another can most effectively meet elders needs. Cross-training and versatile workers within the team allow more people within the team to respond to the elder in front of them instead of having to go find someone else who can do the job. It can also be a great benefit at the busiest times of the day when extra help is needed in one particular area.

Only when the household or neighborhood teams have the responsibility, authority and flexibility to make decisions can they reach their full potential for giving individualized care and creating true home for the elders they serve.

The process of flattening the organization is not something that is done overnight. I suggest 3 steps to move forward with this process.

  1. Make your organization one of Shared Leadership.
  2. Use Learning Circles to help staff communicate.
  3. Create an environment of High Involvement.

We will go into more detail about each of these steps in upcoming blog posts. Please share your own challenges and successes in flattening the organization in the comment section.

LaVrene Norton is the founder of Action Pact, an organization devoted to changing the culture of care environments for elders – making it possible to live in a homey place & have a good day every day, no matter how frail one becomes.  Action Pact has assisted care organizations on their journey to households since 1997. Norton is co-author with Steve Shields of In Pursuit of the Sunbeam, and publisher of a variety of educational books, workbooks and videos focusing on the Household Model.