Manor Park Sees Greater Staff Retention with New Households

The “Wall of Fame” at Manor Park, Inc. is likely to get a lot more crowded now that person-centered care and the Household Model are leading to less staff turnover.

The wall is lined with photos of staff members who have worked five years or longer at the Life Plan Community (LPC) in Midland, TX. With turnover plummeting from 44 to 30 percent for all employees over the past four years, more photos are sure to be added as more staff reach the five-year threshold. Continue reading “Manor Park Sees Greater Staff Retention with New Households”

Four Ways to Build the Culture You Want to See in Your Senior Community

I had a conversation with a leadership team recently that was incredibly frustrated by the initiative being taken by aides in the building. The complaint was that they were sitting around at the nurse’s station when they weren’t busy with cares. Leadership wanted them to be engaging with residents. But in most traditional nursing homes, this is not what CNA’s understand as their job. To get to this place we have to create a culture where engaging with residents is everyone’s job. Continue reading “Four Ways to Build the Culture You Want to See in Your Senior Community”

Highlighting High Involvement at The Cedars

The Cedars, a retirement community in Portland Maine, has long held and worked toward a vision for person-centered life. They have been engaged in learning, practicing, stumbling and achieving minor and major feats moving away from institution toward home.

Lately they have been working hard at High Involvement – engaging a Steering Team and several Action Teams, as well as holding a variety of circles — some for fun, some to work step-by-step through large and often complex decisions. One of the action teams focuses on getting the word out. Continue reading “Highlighting High Involvement at The Cedars”

Flying High with Self-led Teams

MARVIN’S PILOT GOT IT RIGHT!

One of the most unifying and powerful accomplishments of self-led teams is realizing that no job and no person is viewed as greater than another. The equation itself is simple: no greater than or less than, only equal to. So every job is just as important as the next. All the jobs that need to be done in a household are done to help the members of that household have a better day. It doesn’t matter if it is wiping the table or taking out the trash or helping with medications. Self-led teams do not get hung up on titles, you simply get in where you fit in that day. Continue reading “Flying High with Self-led Teams”

Life Soars at St. John’s New CCRC in Albert Lea, Minnesota

Eagle crop2Residents will have eagle eyes watching over them when they move into one of the new households at Fountain Lake in Albert Lea, MN – especially if it’s nesting season.

“We didn’t know a bald eagle’s nest was on the property until about a year after we purchased it,” says Scot Spates, Administrator at St. John’s Lutheran Community.

Continue reading “Life Soars at St. John’s New CCRC in Albert Lea, Minnesota”

More Freedom for Staff Means a Better Life for Residents

Thursday, 1:30 p.m., the moment residents in Inglis House’s 3-South neighborhood have been waiting for has arrived. It’s Tea Time. They steer their wheelchairs toward the solarium where snacks, music, companionship, and of course, a wide assortment of tea await.

“It’s my favorite thing we’ve started since I’ve been here,” says Michael Kelly, Neighborhood Life Leader. He latched onto the idea while looking for a way to divert residents from dwelling on their debilitating diseases. Continue reading “More Freedom for Staff Means a Better Life for Residents”

Residents with disabilities find new life in Inglis Neighborhoods

Evidence that person-centered care is making a difference.”

So wrote Gavin Kerr, Inglis CEO, in an email he forwarded to his executive team last July. In the original message, a physical therapist praises long-term care staff at Inglis House in Philadelphia for the remarkable progress made by a resident with severe physical disabilities.

“They (staff) did the impossible,” the therapist wrote. One resident “told me she got out of bed and ate in the solarium yesterday. This is something that has not been done as far as I know, ever. She is now agreeing to get out of bed three times a week to eat lunch in the solarium… We talked; ‘New room, new life,’ she said.” Continue reading “Residents with disabilities find new life in Inglis Neighborhoods”