Life Soars at St. John’s New CCRC in Albert Lea, Minnesota

Grandma will have eagle eyes watching over her when she moves into one of the new households at Fountain Lake in Albert Lea, MN – especially if it’s nesting season. “We didn’t know a bald eagle’s nest was on the property until about a year after we purchased it,” says Scot Spates, Administrator at St. John’s Lutheran Community.
When the nursing home opens this summer, residents will have a front row seat for the annual show of fledglings from the north side decks on the second and third floor. The third floor balcony offers practically a bird’s eye view into the nest about 80 feet away…. Continue reading

More Freedom for Staff Means a Better Life for Residents

Thursday, 1:30 p.m., the moment residents in Inglis House’s 3-South neighborhood have been waiting for has arrived. It’s Tea Time. They steer their wheelchairs toward the solarium where snacks, music, companionship, and of course, a wide assortment of tea await… Since Inglis House has pivoted toward person-centered care and the Neighborhood Model, staff members feel more freedom to initiate events like Tea Time, and that’s translating into a better life for residents, sometimes with shocking results. Continue reading

ACTION PACT GOES RURAL!

Our household model, the first of its kind in the Hiawatha area, will encourage individuals to live life on their own terms, with the support of our highly-trained staff members. Our mission is to create a deep sense of connectivity between elders, their family and friends, and the community they live in Continue reading

LESSONS FROM THE ROAD

We all want to feel a sense of meaning and purpose in our lives – to be part of something bigger than ourselves and aspire to a higher moral purpose. Many of us find this meaning in our work and implementing the Household Model enables us to do just that because even on difficult days we feel fulfilled knowing we are enabling a better life for our most vulnerable…

The takeaway from my last 10 years is that culture change work is fulfilling, morally uplifting, and hard – it is especially difficult for direct care givers. But there is no doubt it is “worth it” in the end. Continue reading